5 Fun Things to Do With Your Pet

Fall is just around the corner, and you want to enjoy what’s left of the warm weather with your pet with more than just the usual walk around the block. If this sounds like you, consider these five activity ideas for summer fun with your four-legged friend that can boost your pet’s enjoyment level a few notches and strengthen the pet/owner bond. And although we hope it doesn’t happen, should an emergency occur, remember that Veterinary Emergency Group in White Plains, NY is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Fun Things to Do With Your Pet

  1. Dog Parks: Even if your dog has been to a dog park before, no two days at a dog park are exactly the same. There are always new dogs and people to meet and different squirrels and birds to chase. And perhaps the best part for your dog is that at many dog parks, dogs can roam free to play catch or hide-and-seek. Just be sure to keep an eye on your dog at all times, especially around dogs that are much larger or smaller than yours.
  1. Road Trip: This doesn’t necessarily have to be an extended road trip across state lines. It could be just a quick drive while you run your errands, visit your friends, or pick up some food at your pet-friendly pet store. Many pets love riding in cars and being able to spend time with you, instead of waiting at home for your return. Just make sure your pet is comfortable with car rides first before bringing them along. You know your pet better than anyone, so look for the visual cues they give you, and make your decision accordingly.
  1. Backpacking/Hiking: Pet sometimes need a change of scenery, so if you’ve been taking yours to the same places over and over again, try a hike through a trail in the woods for your next excursion. Your pet will love this outdoor adventure and get some exercise at the same time! Remember to fill your backpack with plenty of food, water, bowls, and a first aid kit, and make sure your pet is updated with their preventatives and vaccinations. Carry a first-aid kit for you and your pet as well, and know how to administer basic first aid if your pet becomes injured, and remember, you can call us at any time for emergencies at (914) 949-8779.
  1. Camping: If your dog enjoys the hiking and backpacking, why not turn it into a full camping trip?! During your planning, research the camp area to ensure that it’s pet friendly and to determine the best trails to hike on. Remember to bring an extra sleeping bag and/or blanket as well for your pet to sleep on. For their safety, it’s best to have them sleep in the tent with you, and make sure to keep an eye on them near the grill or fire pit.
  1. Kayaking:Kayaking might be an activity you’ve ever thought of doing with your dog before, but it can actually be very enjoyable for both of you, not to mention a great work out for YOU. If your dog enjoys the water, plan a kayaking trip with them! Just be sure to have a life vest for your dog, in case he jumps or falls out of the kayak.

We want you and your pet to have fun and bond this summer, so we hope these tips will help you do just that. And remember if an emergency should occur while you’re out enjoying these activities, please give us a call at any time at (914) 949-8779. We’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to assist you and your pet.

 

 

Top 3 Pet Travel Items

Traveling With Pets in White Plains, NY

So you’re planning a week-long trip with your pet to sunny Florida this summer, or perhaps you’ll be driving a few hours away for a weekend camping trip. Wherever you’re going and however you’ll get there, Veterinary Emergency Group in White Plains, NY wants your dog or cat to be prepared for the trip.

In addition to food and water, there are many items that should accompany your pet when you travel, for their safety. Far too often, there are pet accidents and injuries that occur that could have been avoided with adequate preparation. We want to prevent these incidents from happening toyour beloved companion, so we have selected what we consider the top three items you need to travel with your pet.

  1. Emergency Supplies/First Aid Kit

Pets are curious by nature and can find themselves in potentially dangerous situations when they’re in a new environment. Hiking in the woods, playing in a dog park—you name it. As a rule of thumb, always bring a pet first aid kit when you travel with your pet. In addition to basic first aid supplies (gauze, scissors, hydrogen peroxide, etc.), your kit should include our phone number (914-949-8779) for local trips and the number of the nearest emergency pet hospital to your destination for long distance trips. Remember, Veterinary Emergency Group is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, should an emergency occur.

  1. Car Safety Harness/Carrier

A car safety pet harness is especially important for long road trips or trips on bumpy roads. Most pet safety harnesses are designed with a seat belt loop so they can be secured by a locked seat belt. A safety harness can keep your pet safe and seated while preventing any distractions caused by their roaming around the car. There are many sizes and styles available to accommodate most pet breeds. For air travel, all airlines that allow pets require pet carriers. Just be sure to check with your airline first for their pet policy, including the carrier dimension requirements.

  1. Pet Supplies

This may seem like an obvious item, but you’d be surprised at how many pet owners forget to bring their pet’s leash or collar during trips. Keep in mind that many places, such as parks and beaches, require that pets be on a leash at all times. Plus, many pets can be act unpredictably in a new environment and will likely want to explore, so keeping them on a leash will help keep them from chasing squirrels and rabbits, following the scent of another pet, etc. Make sure that your pet has identification as well, whether it’s in the form of an ID tag, a microchip, or both. Having a recent photo handy is also a great idea.

Emergency and Urgent Care for Your Pet

Emergencies can happen at any time of the day, when many veterinary hospitals are closed. Even if you think an emergency will never occur with your pet, it’s important to know where the nearest emergency vet is located. Located in White Plains, NY, The Veterinary Emergency Group serves pets from a number of communities, ranging from Manhattan to the Bronx. We have been providing emergency and urgent care services for over 25 years. Whether your pet needs treatment for a fracture, wound, or any other emergency, our experienced veterinarians are here to help.

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Our hospital is open nights, weekends, and all major holidays, for your convenience to treat your pet, and no appointment is required. However, we ask that you call before your arrival, if possible. Our hours are:

Monday        6pm-8am
Tuesday       6pm-8am
Wednesday  6pm-8am
Thursday      6pm-8am
*Friday          6pm-
*Saturday     24 hours
*Sunday       24 hours

We know how stressful it can be to have a pet experience an accident, so you can be confident that our team of compassionate, skilled doctors will provide exceptional care in a timely manner. We also take the time to discuss your pet’s treatment in detail to ensure you have a full understanding of their condition.

Common Emergencies We Treat

The Veterinary Emergency Group treats virtually any pet emergency. Our facility is equipped with an in-house laboratory, digital X-ray technology, a Snyder ICU unit, and more to treat your pet. Some of the most common emergencies we treat include:

  • Trauma and other injuries
  • Puncture and other wounds
  • Poisoning
  • Acute lameness
  • Respiratory problems
  • Heatstroke
  • Seizures

You can learn more about the conditions we treat by visiting our Urgent Care and Emergencies pages. If you think your pet is in need of emergency or urgent care, give us a call at (914) 949-8779 to speak with a doctor.

Top Ten Winter Skin & Paw Care Tips

Exposure
to winter’s dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause chapped
paws and itchy, flaking skin, but these aren’t the only discomforts pets can
suffer. Winter walks can become downright dangerous if chemicals from
ice-melting agents are licked off of bare paws.
Says Dr.
Louise Murray, Vice President of the ASPCA
Animal Hospital,
“During the winter, products used as de-icers on sidewalks and other areas can
lead to trouble for our animal companions, potentially causing problems ranging
from sore feet to internal toxicity. Pet parents should take precautions to
minimize their furry friends’ exposure to such agents.” To help prevent cold
weather dangers from affecting your pet’s paws and skin, please heed the
following advice from our experts: 
·
Repeatedly coming out of the cold into the dry heat can cause itchy, flaking
skin. Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as he comes
inside, paying special attention to his feet and in between the toes. · Trim
long-haired dogs to minimize the clinging of ice balls, salt crystals and
de-icing chemicals that can dry on the skin. (Don’t neglect the hair between
the toes!) 
· Bring a
towel on long walks to clean off stinging, irritated paws. After each walk,
wash and dry your pet’s feet to remove ice, salt and chemicals—and check for
cracks in paw pads or redness between the toes. 
· Bathe
your pets as little as possible during cold spells. Washing too often can
remove essential oils and increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin. If
your pooch must be bathed, ask your vet to recommend a moisturizing shampoo
and/or rinse. 
 ·
Dressing your pet in a sweater or coat will help to retain body heat and
prevent skin from getting dry. · Booties help minimize contact with painful
salt crystals, poisonous anti-freeze and chemical ice-melting agents. They can
also help prevent sand and salt from getting lodged in between bare toes,
causing irritation. Use pet-friendly ice melts whenever possible. · Massaging
petroleum jelly into paw pads before going outside helps to protect from salt
and chemical agents. And moisturizing after a good toweling off helps to heal
chapped paws. 
·
Brushing your pet regularly not only gets rid of dead hair, but also stimulates
blood circulation, improving the skin’s overall condition. 
· Pets
burn extra energy by trying to stay warm in wintertime, sometimes causing
dehydration. Feeding your pet a little bit more during the cold weather and
making sure she has plenty of water to drink will help to keep her well-hydrated,
and her skin less dry. 
·
Remember, if the weather’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your
pet. Animal companions should remain indoors as much as possible during the
winter months and never be left alone in vehicles when the mercury drops. 
 SOURCE:
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/top-ten-winter-skin-paw-care-tips

One Thing you should Never see on Pet Food Label

If you see the words “veterinarian approved” on your pet food
label, look out. That claim is always untrue.

Veterinarians do not approve labels or products. Only state regulatory
agencies can do that, according to the The Business of Pet Food, a new
website launched by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO).
That’s just a taste of the information you’ll find on the site: www.petfood.aafco.org.
What else?
Ingredient lists, labeling requirements, analyses of commercial pet food and
government regulations for making and labeling pet food.
The site is for people who sell pet food — or want to. But there’s lots of
information for pet owners, too.
“Many people are surprised by how many regulations apply to the pet
food industry,” says Liz Higgins, Chair of AAFCO‘s Pet Food Committee.
For example, did you know “veterinarian recommended” means that
the company making the food actually surveyed veterinarians to find out if they
would recommend the food?
And, like we said, “veterinarian approved” is never true.
So, if you’ve ever wondered …
What’s really in my pet’s food?
What would it take to turn my secret recipe for Tasty Treats into a
mail-order business?
Go to http://www.petfood.aafco.org.

Originally
published by Healthy Pet.

Wobbles-Veterinary Emergency Group Mascot

On
Sunday night October 29th 2012, a good samaritan brought in a wet, cold, lost
dog to VEG since we were the only animal hospital open during the storm. She
was evaluated to be dehydrated and was showing neurological signs making us
concerned about the possibility of head trauma. She was admitted to the hospital
and treated appropriately figuring as soon as Hurricane Sandy had past, we
would hear from the concerned parents of this lost dog.
Over
the next few days, we slowly weaned her off treatment however she continued to
have neurological signs. We had not heard from anyone about a lost dog but we
figured since there was no power or gasoline in the area, it could be a few
days for the owners to finally contact us.

As
of today, Wobbles, as we affectionately call her, is still here and is now our
very loveable hospital mascot! She is a happy and loving dog but still has
neurological signs. Everyone who meets her falls in love with her. She comforts
owners who have to leave their pets here for hospitalization. She has a way of
bringing smiles to the saddest faces.

The staff has provided her with beds, toys, bowls, food, and treats! One of the
associate veterinarians has spayed her. Clients love her and inquire about her
all the time. We even had a neurologist evaluate her free of charge! However,
his recommendation is an MRI and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap so that we can
specifically determine the underlying cause of her neurologic problem and
potentially improve her condition. We are planning on scheduling her MRI for
this week and we are keeping our fingers crossed!

Wobbles should be getting her MRI this week! Thanks everyone!!!!

 Wobbles Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wobbles/359104157540753
Wobbles Donation Page (We’ve raised $2000 so far!): http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/wobbles-needs-an-mri?c=home

Pets & Pool Safety

Swimming is one of the most fun activities for a hot summer day, for people and pets! Just keep in mind that your pets need supervision just like your children. When you can’t be outside with them, keep your pool gates closed and locked to prevent unwanted swimmers from entering the area. Help keep your children and pets, and those who live in your neighborhood, safe!